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What You Should Know About Writing a Will

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What is a will? How do you choose a person to manage your will? When should you update your overall estate plan? A will is simply a legal document that governs the transfer of the assets in your own name after your death. Below are select videos from the ACTEC Family Estate Planning Guide series that answer common questions and explain the basics of a will and other essential estate planning documents. 

 

Getting Your Affairs in Order: Essential Legal Documents

What legal documents should we have in place to prepare for an emergency, such as the Coronavirus pandemic? Learn more about a Durable Power of Attorney (aka Financial Power of Attorney) and Advanced Healthcare Directives - Healthcare Proxy, Living Will. 

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What is a Will and Why Do I Need One?

Experts in estate planning answer questions that families often have when preparing a will such as: 

  • How a will helps with the transfer of assets after death;
  • What a will does not do;
  • How do you create a will; and
  • Can you create a will online as an e-will or electronic will?

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How to Choose your Executor or Trustee

Selecting an executor or trustee to oversee your will or trust requires careful consideration. Learn about the duties of an executor or trustee, traits to look for when selecting an individual(s) executor or trustee and when to consider a corporate trustee.  

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5 Reasons to Update your Estate Plan

Understand when to update a will or trust, such as after a move or divorce, when your children grow up or if you have a business.

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Should I Sign New Estate Planning Documents When I Move to a New State? 

Understand why it’s important to review and update your estate planning documents, such as a will, Power of Attorney, and Revocable Trust, following a move to a new state. 

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Digital Asset Management in Life and Death 

Understand how to plan and manage your digital assets, such as photos, email accounts and passwords, during life and in your will and estate documents.

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